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March 2017

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milliner

Photoessay Part 2 of 2: Philip Treacy's hat blocks

Today, the second part of the exhibit of Philip Treacy's hat blocks at the Tate Liverpool in the UK. All of the photos were taken by my dear friend and hat enthusiast Califia Davis. Check out Part One of the series posted yesterday as well!

Today's images include blocks for hats such as this iconic hat of Isabella Blow's (displayed next to Treacy's original sparterie version the block carver was working from), some of the blocks in this design sketch of Treacy's, and this dramatic hat.

Again, I love being able to see where the rope-lines are on these pieces, and where the hats come apart into different blocked sections, based on these images! The oblique views are great to see the side dimensions of the blocks, and the close-ups of the portrait blocks as well--I've never seen that "pop art/portrait" collection up close in person, and assumed they were flat digital prints or lithographs mounted on headbands and fascinator bases, not images screened onto blocked dimensional bases!

Now, starting panoramically down the fourth of the six displays:

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Oblique Views

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Detail shots of the portrait blocks

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If you've read the dual-language English/Italian bio of Treacy, you've seen some of these blocks in there in the images from his studio. I believe some of them came along on the "When Philip Met Isabella" exhibition tour as well, which was an exhibit of the hats he made for Isabella Blow.

And, because voting is open for another four days:

Have you voted for my entry in the Stephen Jones hat contest yet? Don't limit yourself to just my entry--look through the rest of them as well and be sure to vote for as many as you like! I don't really view this as a competition so much as a festival of millinery arts, where visibility for all of us and support for as many talented milliners as possible can only be a good thing.

One concern that a few folks have mentioned is, you have to allow the Talenthouse application access to your Facebook information in order to vote. This is to make sure people aren't shilling with duplicate votes (which, of course you could create a bunch of separate fake Facebook accounts and there's a loophole in everything, but that's the general idea), you can always rescind accessibility from it after you vote. Under "Account Settings," choose "Applications" from the left sidebar, and just remove Talenthouse.

Though, you might wait til you have looked at ALL the great hats and voted for as many as you like, and for that matter, you might even decide to participate in the Talenthouse community after all--they have some great contests with some serious heavy-hitters for folks in all disciplines of the arts, everything from designing a visual identity for the English National Ballet for graphic artists, to an opening gig at Rain in Vegas with Paul Oakenfold for DJs. It's a fairly high-visibility forum for your work! But, if your concern with voting is FB-access-related, there you go: how to disable it afterward.

And, because I don't just talk the talk, I walk the walk: tomorrow I'm embarking on a series of posts featuring OTHER entrants in the contest whose work I admire, my "picks" in the contest, as it were. If I were part of the judging committee, these will be the milliners and hats i'd have shortlisted!

Comments

Thank you so much for sharing the pics of the blocks, I always wondered how he pulled off (literally, apparently) those shapes!
Aren't they great? I even love being able to see things like which way the block maker has chosen to orient the wood grain!